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Letters: Buck turns a blind eye; Polis should retain email records for longer than 30 days; Attorney unplugged unfairly (11/19/19)

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letters:-buck-turns-a-blind-eye;-polis-should-retain-email-records-for-longer-than-30-days;-attorney-unplugged-unfairly-(11/19/19)

Buck turns a blind eye

Re: “Buck: ‘It’s not impeachable’ to request investigation,” Nov. 15 news story

It is disturbing to realize we have elected people to office, like Rep. Ken Buck, who do not recognize corruption when they see it. When the president offers a government resource (say, military aid) in exchange for a concession on the part of another country (say, a reduction in nuclear testing), that is the normal quid pro quo arrived at through negotiation.

When the president offers a government resource to another country in order to receive something of benefit personally (say, an investigation of a political rival) that is corruption and an abuse of the power of the office. Now, Rep. Buck can say he does not believe President Donald Trump was withholding military support to pressure Ukraine, but that requires he totally ignore all the testimony that declared there was a quid pro quo. If Buck cannot look at the evidence and see the corruption, perhaps we need to look deeper at how Buck conducts his official affairs.

Douglas Willey, Highlands Ranch


Polis should retain email records for longer than 30 days

Re: “Policies on email vary in Colorado,” Nov. 8 news story

We owe reporters at The Denver Post a thank you. Because of their reporting, the Polis administration’s veil of secrecy surrounding open records policies is being removed before our very eyes.

Following up on recent reports on the Polis administration’s public records policies, The Post highlighted something even more troubling — the governor’s own record retention policy. According to The Post, the governor’s office adopted a policy that holds on to emails for 30 days before dumping them in the virtual document shredder. Fear not! There are exceptions: for example, emails related to ongoing litigation.

Nevertheless, the majority of email communications by the governor and those in his office stay in the public eye for a very short time.

With any number of troubling developments that could last the life of an administration, retaining email communications for 30 days is troublesome. We must demand more from our public officials.

Travis Martinez, Parker


Attorney unplugged unfairly

Re: “KNUS’s Silverman says he was taken off radio show,” Nov. 17 news story

Attorney Craig Silverman got yanked off the air mid-show this past Saturday morning after discussing the highly damaging House impeachment testimony, accurately describing it as bribery and noting the charge is specifically mentioned in the Constitution as an impeachable offense.

This revelation was apparently too much for the fragile ears of station management at KNUS (owned by Salem Media, a decidedly right-wing corporation), and he was dismissed immediately.

Morning to night, the station’s local lineup boasts a depressingly unified cadre of Trump apologists, sycophants and cheerleaders. Silverman was marginally one of them during the first couple years of 45’s term, but the recent Ukraine testimony was apparently too much for this former prosecutor to stomach. Well, better late than never, one presumes.

Paul Siegel, Denver

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