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🔥St. Louis aldermen advance pay increase for civil service workers🔥

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St. Louis aldermen advance pay increase for civil service workers

St. Louis City Hall pictured in October 2016.

ST. LOUIS — Alderman on Friday advanced a bill that would raise pay for city civil service employees for the next two years in a bid to address staffing shortages and give most workers a one-time $1,000 bonus in April. The Board of Aldermen on Friday gave preliminary approval to Board Bill 200, sponsored by Alderman Carol Howard, D-14th Ward. The bill is up for a final vote Feb. 21. If approved, the pay hikes would go into effect over the next two fiscal years beginning next summer.The bill would increase the annual merit raise for civil service workers to 3% from the current 1.5% for fiscal years 2021 and 2022. Full-time workers employed as of March 29 would also receive a one-time, $1,000 bonus in April. The bill gives city employees their first significant raise since 2003, Howard said. Alderman Sharon Tyus, D-1st Ward, and Alderman Jesse Todd, D-18th Ward, said they supported raises for city employees but that the city could better address staffing shortages by cutting unneeded positions, marketing vacancies to residents and connecting them with job training programs.“I do not think we are doing everything we can to hire people,” Tyus said. Board Bill 200 would also establish by city ordinance a $15 minimum wage for city employees.Mayor Lyda Krewson last month issued an executive order setting $15 as the new minimum wage for civil service employees. The order, which takes effect this month, raises the pay for about 720 current workers and about 300 to be hired on a seasonal basis in the spring and summer.City Treasurer Tishaura Jones last year did the same when she won approval of a new $15 minimum wage for 99 of her office’s lowest-paid jobs, including many in the city parking division. The treasurer’s office is an independent elected post and not part of the city civil service system.Revenue Collector Gregory F.X. Daly said in a tweet this week that he raised the minimum wage in his office to $15 two years ago.

I was very happy to see the minimum wage for city employees raised to $15 an hour. This is something we implemented two years ago in our office, recognizing that everyone deserves a livable wage. #goodgovernment #FightFor15
— Gregory FX Daly (@gregoryfxdaly) February 12, 2020

The statewide minimum wage set by Missouri law is $9.45 an hour, up from $8.60 in 2019. The federal minimum wage, which hasn’t changed since 2009, is $7.25 an hour.

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St. Louis City Hall pictured in October 2016.

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